How Good of a Shooter Do You Want to Be?

how-good-do-you-want-to-be

If you want to get good at shooting, there is only one way to do it…Dry Fire.  I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, it’s the “Secret to shooting like a Navy SEAL.” So many people these days want to take shortcuts to everything they do. Hell, I’m one of them, but learning to shoot is one thing there’s no app for.  The reason for practicing dry weapons manipulation (a.k.a. Dry Fire) is to neurologically teach your body the correct movements you would like it to do while under stress (Muscle Memory).  To do this you must SLOWLY go thru the correct movements EXACTLY how you want to do it when milliseconds will be the difference between life and death.  You should NEVER try to go fast!  Speed will come thru practicing smooth, deliberate, mistake-free movements.  Remember, smooth is fast (but slow is just slow).

If you make a mistake while practicing, go back one step and do it right.  You don’t want to reinforce making and correcting mistakes.  Remember: Live fire only confirms how much dry training you’ve conducted, and bullets will magnify your errors.  Below is a list of things you can practice besides just squeezing the trigger…

Review Fundamentals of Marksmanship and practice each one individually.

Pistol:

  • Shooting and moving
    • Forward, back, left, right, obliques
  • Shooting with both eyes open/picking up front sight
  • Draw
  • Draw with reaction hand
  • Magazine changes
    • Tactical Reloads
    • Magazine changes with strong hand only
    • Magazine changes with reaction hand only
  • Strong hand, unsupported
  • Reaction hand, unsupported
  • Immediate/remedial action drills
    • Failure to Feed
    • Failure to go into battery
    • Stove-Pipe
    • Double feed
  • Barricades
  • Turning
  • Shooting positions
    • Standing
    • Squatting
    • Kneeling
    • Sitting
    • Prone
    • Supine
    • Urban Prone
    • Fetal Prone
  • Scan and assess
  • Manipulating light(s)
  • Shooting with hand-held light

Rifle:

  • Finding natural point-of-aim
  • Picking up sight from low-ready (EO/Iron)
  • Picking up sight from high-ready (EO/Iron)
  • Shooting positions
    • Standing
    • Squatting
    • Kneeling
    • Sitting
    • Prone
    • Supine
    • Urban Prone
    • Fetal Prone
    • SBU
  • Barricades
    • Both shoulders/both eyes/off shoulder
  • Acquiring multiple targets
  • Magazine changes
    • Tactical Reloads
  • Immediate action drills
    • Failure to Feed
    • Failure to go into battery
    • Stove-Pipe
    • Double feed
    • Bolt override
  • Barricades
  • Transitions
  • One-handed shooting
  • One-handed magazine changes
  • Shooting and moving
    • Forward, back, left, right, obliques
    • Both shoulders
  • Scan and assess
  • Manipulating light(s)
  • Shooting with hand-held light
  • Slinging/securing your weapon/retention

Your goal should be to dry fire four times as much as you live fire.  So if you plan to shoot for one hour this weekend, you should dry fire four hours this week.  It may sound like a lot, but you just need to decide how good of a shooter do you want to be?  Always try to have someone watch you when you train to make sure you’re doing everything correctly, and remember to log what you did in your range book!

Chris Sajnog