New Rules of Marksmanship Firearms Training Plan

training-plan

Now that you’re an MVP shooter, after learning how to train your mind to become a better shooter, we need to come up with a Firearms Training Plan. Lucky for you, New Rule #2 is all about Planning. I’m sure you understand the importance of planning when it comes to your vacations or, hopefully, even your life, but what about planning out your firearms training? And when I talk about planning, I’m not talking about a drill you’re going to shoot, a skill you’re going to work on or even a full day at the range. Nope. I’m talking about figuring out where you are now as a shooter and where you want to go.

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Go West, Young Man!

Twenty-one years ago, I was on my way to BUD/S (Navy SEAL Training) to class-up with class 198. I was in Virginia Beach, Virginia, at the time and I decided to drive all the way across our great nation to Coronado, CA, staying on all back roads and never using a map — just heading west. That trip is something I’ll never forget. I ate every meal at a diner and usually just ordered the “Special.” One time that got me a dozen eggs, a pound of bacon and a loaf of toast. I picked up hitchhikers (one smelled so bad I had to stop for a day to air out my car) and took detours anytime I saw a sign saying something cool like “the world’s biggest ball of yarn” was nearby.

A trip that takes about forty hours of driving ended up taking me two weeks. But that was by choice.

When it comes to firearms training — you too have a choice: 1) Plan out your training and reach your destination quickly or 2) Not plan out your training and have a stinky car.

7 Keys to Start Paving Your Path to Perfection

I’m going to keep this one short so you can start planning, but here are a few key points to remember when it comes to planning your training:

  • A course is NOT a plan. A course can be a road along the way  — it’s not a plan. (Unless your end goal is to take a course.)
  • My plan will NOT work for you. It will not work for anyone else. Get your own damn plan!
  • If it’s not written down, it’s called a dream — NOT a plan. (Dreams are fine…they are just not plans)
  • If you say you are going to start your plan tomorrow… or next week or next month — that’s called lying to yourself. Right Now is the ONLY starting point.
  • You don’t need anyone’s help to come up with a plan; others can be helpful, but they’re not a requirement.
  • Tell someone your plan and have them hold you accountable. Better yet — get your family involved and train together.
  • Follow the New Rules as a template to set up HOW you should train.

Listen, if all you’re doing is going to the range or watching YouTube videos or even if you just keep going to different courses — that’s not a plan! All you’re doing is heading west…and that can be fun, but if you’re in a hurry or you don’t have a lot of free time to waste — you need a plan.

So, what’s your plan?

It’s amazing how many people don’t have a plan. Even running a course, it’s impossible to have a plan that’s going to work for everyone there. Everyone is at different starting points and everyone learns at different rates. Going into a course with a set plan would be like giving these directions to people in different cities around the world:

  1. Go straight slowly for 2 miles
  2. Turn left
  3. Drive four miles
  4. Turn right
  5. Drive as fast as you can without crashing for 5 minutes
  6. You reached your destination

Could you imagine? All different people, places, starting points, etc. It’s the same thing when it comes to shooting. It’s impossible to quickly navigate your path to perfection with a cookie-cutter plan. I did it for twenty years. It’s the reason so many people are frustrated with learning to shoot! The good news is that coming up with a personalized plan is as easy as letting the GPS in your car 1) tell you where you’re at, 2) Tell you the quickest route and 3) Give corrections to you as soon as you start moving.

Here’s how to develop your personalized New Rules Firearms Training Plan:

  • Gather information: Find out where you’re at, what you need to work on and exactly what type of shooter you want to be. A new concealed carry shooter will not have the same starting or end points as an experienced IPSC shooter.
  • Plan: This is where you figure out what training you can do at home and the time and days you’re going to do it. What skills, in what order? This can include a course or investing in an amazing firearms training manual.
  • Start: Don’t wait for tomorrow — it never comes. This is the hardest step! Get going and you’ll see how easy it is to learn how to shoot.

Have you started your plan as a New Rules Shooter? Here’s what I want you to do right now. Leave a comment down below and tell the rest of world, “I’ve got a Plan and I’ve started Paving my Path to Perfection!” Next, I’ll be taking everyone back to our childhood again and talking about how a favorite children’s story can teach us the importance of using mechanics and not methods when it comes to shooting. Any guesses on the book?

Chris Sajnog